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Crops

Renewed Optimism in Farming

Farm economy sees strong turnaround for grain farms. A couple months ago economists were predicting near-zero profits for Illinois farmers. Now the grain farm outlook appears to be much better while livestock farms continue to be financially stressed. The University of Illinois and Purdue University findings and projections were reported in an ...read more

What if Farmers Did Not Use Pesticides?

Farmers use many tools to produce the food that ends up on our plates. Among them are crop protection products, also known as pesticides. Crop protection helps control weeds, pests and diseases that starve food crops of the nutrients, sunlight and water needed to thrive. Pesticide is a general term that covers ...read more

Ear Size Matters

The number of kernels per ear of corn is an important contributor to the grain yield potential of a corn plant. Ideal growing conditions and a hybrid’s genetics determine ear size and exceptional yields at harvest. The number of kernel rows multiplied by the number of kernels per row equates to ...read more

Monarch Project Takes Flight

Farmers & Farm Bureau Promote Butterfly Conservation One year after the Illinois Monarch Project Agriculture Action Plan was unveiled, Farm Bureau continues to highlight voluntary conservation efforts geared toward pollinators. Illinois Farm Bureau (IFB) recently submitted data to the Illinois Monarch Project (IMP) for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) ...read more

Harvest May Stretch Into December

Farmers are ready to wrap up this year’s harvest but some are still weeks away from being done. DeKalb County harvest is running about a month behind schedule. The lateness is attributed to a wet spring – most corn and soybean fields didn’t get planted until June – then a wet ...read more

DeKalb County Ag by the Numbers – NOT Knee High

DeKalb County corn typically well exceeds the old saying that corn is “Knee-High by the 4th of July.” However, due to unprecedented rains and this year’s planting crisis, many corn fields are barren or behind in growth. On average, DeKalb County corn is about 5 feet tall by the 4th of ...read more

Local Sweet Corn Behind Pace, But Ready Soon

Mark Yaeger knows that everyone is ready for their first taste of locally grown sweet corn in July but they will have to wait until August. This year’s wet and cooler spring weather has delayed sweet corn production by about one month. In a “normal” year sweet corn is tasseling by ...read more

Crop Update: Shortfall of Corn in County

Many farmers are calling this year’s corn crop a disaster. For two good reasons – thousands of corn acres didn’t get planted due to relentless rainfall and the corn which was planted is less than ideal. “Farming is never easy, but this one was the worst in my 31 years of ...read more

Reduced Corn Crop Impacts Ag Retailers

Fewer corn acres will have a significant effect on the ag supply chain. Lindon Gord knows what to expect with a reduction in corn acreage in DeKalb County. “Less crop means less equipment use, less repairs, and less parts,” said the general manager and partner of DeKalb Implement. In DeKalb County about ...read more

Planting Dilemma

By now farmers are usually scouting their growing crops. In early June, farmers were still struggling to get crops planted due to unrelenting rainfall. The number of acres of corn and soybeans not yet planted is unprecedented. Only about 15% of corn had been planted by June 1st in DeKalb County. ...read more